How to prevent most common truck driver injuries

How to prevent most common truck driver injuries

Prevent most common truck driver injuries. If someone tells you that driving a truck is a safe job, he or she probably never drove a vehicle in their entire life.

How to prevent most common truck driver injuries

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Besides serious truck driver injuries that accompany accidents on the road, truckers suffer from muscle sprains, falling objects, equipment malfunctions and much more. The hazardous nature of a trucker’s job calls for careful thinking and serious safety precautions.

The list of the common truck driver injuries includes:

  • Back injury. This is the most common problem that the truckers face when lifting heavy cargo during loading and unloading.
  • Surprisingly enough, many truck drivers suffer from falls. They fall from their cabins or down the stairs when carrying freight. Some truckers report slipping on ice when changing tires.
  • The biggest percentage of work-related trucking injuries come from the road accidents.
  • Driver’s error. The most common cause of injuries behind the wheel is a driver’s error. Fatigue, distraction, and poor training are only a few causes for such mistakes that can turn fatal.
  • Equipment problems. Truckers often get injured due to defective truck parts, bad breaks, and tire maintenance. The reason for equipment problems is usually bad or missed inspections.
  • Improper cargo loading. When the cargo is not loaded properly, the truck can lose its ability to maneuver and handle the road.
  • Weather conditions. Ice, hail, rain and snow hinder the driver’s ability to steer and handle the truck.

Most of the injuries that truckers suffer at work can be prevented. Here are a few things that can be done.

  1. Frequent breaks

Too many accidents happen due to drivers falling asleep behind the wheel. Taking frequent breaks can help avoid these problems.

Important: Overindulging on caffeine can lead to exhaustion.

  1. Back braces

In order to avoid back injuries, it’s compulsory to wear back braces and use other special equipment for loading and unloading the cargo. Freight handling is not created to flaunt your macho abilities.

  1. Secure loads

Properly secured loads ensure good cargo distribution inside the truck. Even if the distance is short, this shouldn’t be overlooked. Loads can dangerously shift in a matter of seconds.

  1. Reflective clothing

High visibility reflective clothing/vest is compulsory for truckers who travel at night. It can save the trucker’s life when he exits the truck.

  1. Good footwear

Proper footwear can save a trucker from slipping on the ice or falling off the stairs. Good trucker’s footwear must offer maximum friction.

  1. Regular inspections

Insisting on regular inspections, especially before and after long hauls can save a trucker from an accident caused by equipment malfunction.

  1. Wearing a seatbelt

It seems that this simple truth should be in every driver’s blood. But many truckers sometimes ignore the rule. Especially when they plan a short drive.

  1. Jumping

Some truck drivers like jumping from the cabin to the ground. That’s one of the reasons why injuries from falls are so popular. Even the most experienced “jumpers” can slip. There is no need to take a risk.

 

 

free trucking software

TransIT offering Free Trucking Software

free trucking software

free trucking software

Irving, TX: TransIT TMS is offering free trucking software for owner operators and small trucking companies operating two trucks or less in their fleet. Interested owner operators and small trucking companies can sign up at the website selecting the package and following through the sign up process. Once you have signed up, you will be provided with the username and password to access the software within 24 – 48 hours (currently there is a delay). TransIT is the only software provider offering free web based trucking software in the trucking industry.

TransIT TMS helps you manage trucking operation efficiently by offering complete truck management system. Set up and dispatch easily from anywhere.

As always, we will be here when you need support.

Thank you for your continued support.

Operations Manager

TransIT

news@transittms.com

Truck Safety Campaign Launched

FMCSA Launches New Safety Campaign to Promote Sharing Roads with trucks

Give room for trucks - Truck Safety

share the road with trucks

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has launched a new campaign called “Our Roads, Our Responsibility,” which is aimed at educating the public about how to operate their vehicles safely around large trucks, buses and other commercial motor vehicles (CMVs).

According to the FMCSA, there are more than 12 million CMVs on the road, and operating safely around them often means taking special precautions into consideration. The campaign offers drivers the following tips:

  • Avoid driving in blind spots at the front, back and on the sides of these vehicles. These blind spots are often larger than some drivers estimate, so give CMVs plenty of room.
  • In order to safely pass a large CMV, make sure you can see the driver in the mirror before passing or changing lanes.
  • Large vehicles may need more room to execute turns, so give them the extra room to do so.
  • Remain focused on the road and avoid distractions.

The FMCSA urges both commercial drivers and the public to visit its website, which has additional resources and information available.
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Truck Safety – Truck Safe driving, Truck Safety when driving, Truck Safety on road

Google Starts Carpooling Service with Waze App

waze google car pooling

waze google car pooling

Google Starts Carpooling Service with Waze App

San Francisco: Google Started Carpooling Service around the San Francisco Bay Area with its Waze App. Charging just 54c a mile it seems like the Cheaper alternative to taxis, uber, lyft. etc.

Read More

DOT Brake Safety Week Coming in September

Truck Brake Inspection week sept 11 - 17 2016

Truck Brake Inspection week sept 11 – 17 2016

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Association will be holding its annual brake safety inspection campaign the week of Sept. 11-17, 2016. The event is designed to promote brake safety in commercial vehicles and will focus on brake system compliance.

Commercial vehicle operators should be prepared for inspections by law enforcement officials to include checks for loose or missing parts; air or hydraulic fluid leaks; worn linings, pads, drums or rotors; and other faulty brake-system components.

If inspectors find defective or out-of-service brakes, those vehicles will be placed out of service.

During the week of Sept. 11-17, 2016, law enforcement agencies across North America will conduct inspections on large trucks and buses to identify out-of-adjustment brakes, and brake-system and anti-lock braking system (ABS) violations as part of CVSA’s Brake Safety Week, an annual outreach and enforcement campaign designed to improve commercial motor vehicle (CMV) brake safety throughout North America.

Properly functioning brake systems are crucial to safe CMV operation. CMV brakes are designed to hold up under tough conditions, but they must be routinely inspected and maintained carefully and consistently so they operate and perform properly throughout the vehicle’s life. Improperly installed or poorly maintained brake systems can reduce braking efficiency and increase the stopping distance of trucks and buses, posing serious risks to driver and public safety. ABS systems help the vehicle, and thus the driver, maintain control in certain situations, which reduces the risk of some types of crashes.

Brake-related violations comprised the largest percentage (representing 43 percent) of all out-of-service violations cited during Operation Airbrake’s companion International Roadcheck campaign in 2015, which focused on inspections of both vehicles and drivers.

Inspections conducted during Brake Safety Week include inspection of brake-system components to identify loose or missing parts, air or hydraulic fluid leaks, worn linings, pads, drums or rotors, and other faulty brake-system components. ABS malfunction indicator lamps are also checked. Inspectors will inspect brake components and measure pushrod stroke where applicable. Defective or out-of-adjustment brakes will result in the vehicle being placed out of service.

Many inspectors will be conducting Level I Inspections, and in the 10 jurisdictions currently using performance-based brake testing (PBBT) equipment, vehicle braking efficiency will be measured. These systems include a slow speed roller dynamometer that measures total vehicle weight and total brake force from which braking efficiency is determined. The minimum braking efficiency for trucks is 43.5 percent, required by U.S. federal regulation and the CVSA out-of-service criteria.

Outreach and educational efforts by CMV inspectors, participating motor carriers and others in the industry will also take place during Brake Safety Week and are integral to the success of the campaign.

More than 3.4 million brakes have been inspected since the program’s inception in 1998.

Brake Safety Week is part of the Operation Airbrake program sponsored by CVSA in partnership with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA).

 

How to behave when experience road rage?

Road Range Safety

Woman showing bad gesture

Nearly 80% of Drivers Experience Road Rage

A study released by the American Automobile Association (AAA) Foundation for Traffic Safety found that 78 percent of drivers experienced significant anger, aggression or road rage behind the wheel at least once in the past year. The study – based on a survey of 2,705 licensed drivers – estimated that a large portion of motorists engaged in a variety of angry and aggressive behavior:

• Purposefully tailgating: 51% (104 million drivers)
• Yelling at another driver: 47% (95 million drivers)
• Honking to show annoyance or anger- 45% (91 million drivers)
• Making angry gestures: 33% (67 million drivers)
• Trying to block another vehicle from changing lanes: 24% (49 million drivers)
• Cutting off another vehicle on purpose: 12% (24 million drivers)
• Getting out of the vehicle to confront another driver: 4% (7.6 million drivers)
• Bumping or ramming another vehicle on purpose: 3% (5.7 million drivers)

Additionally, the study notes some significant demographic differences, finding that younger male drivers were much more likely to have engaged in angry or aggressive driving behaviors.
To combat road rage, AAA offers the following tips:
• Don’t offend. Make sure your driving doesn’t cause others to brake, swerve or change lanes unnecessarily.
• Be tolerant and forgiving. Assume the best in other drivers and don’t take their behavior personally.
• Do not respond. Refrain from making gestures, making eye contact or doing anything to escalate the situation. Call 911 if needed.
Read about the Study HERE

Women Transportation/Trucking Initiative(WITI) by DOT

 

Goals of the Program

The goals of the program are to increase the participation of women in the transportation industry and prepare young women to become our nation’s future leaders. To accomplish these goals, the program will:

  1. Creates Ladders of Opportunity to careers and internships in the transportation industry.
  2. Educates WITI participants on the exciting opportunities available in the transportation industry and inspire them to enter the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.
  3. Establishes strategic partnerships through the creation of the Women in Transportation Advisory Committees in each region.
  4. Attracts and Retains female WITI participants in transportation fields through Ladders of Opportunity.
  5. Identifies barriers to economic competitiveness for women particpating in the transportation industry and provide sustainability tools.

Women trucking